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Effect of Magnification on Locating the MB2 Canal in Maxillary Molars

  • Louis J. Buhrley
    Affiliations
    Dr. Buhrley is a former postdoctoral student, Dr. Barrows is clinical assistant professor, and Dr. Wenckus is associate professor, Department of Endodontics; and Dr. BeGole is associate professor of Biostatistics, Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
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  • Michael J. Barrows
    Correspondence
    Address requests for reprints to Dr. Michael J. Barrows, Clinical Assistant Professor and Clinic Director, Endodontics, Department of Endodontics (m/c 642), UIC College of Dentistry, 801 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL 60612.
    Affiliations
    Dr. Buhrley is a former postdoctoral student, Dr. Barrows is clinical assistant professor, and Dr. Wenckus is associate professor, Department of Endodontics; and Dr. BeGole is associate professor of Biostatistics, Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
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  • Ellen A. BeGole
    Affiliations
    Dr. Buhrley is a former postdoctoral student, Dr. Barrows is clinical assistant professor, and Dr. Wenckus is associate professor, Department of Endodontics; and Dr. BeGole is associate professor of Biostatistics, Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
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  • Christopher S. Wenckus
    Affiliations
    Dr. Buhrley is a former postdoctoral student, Dr. Barrows is clinical assistant professor, and Dr. Wenckus is associate professor, Department of Endodontics; and Dr. BeGole is associate professor of Biostatistics, Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL.
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      The purpose of this study was to determine if the surgical operating microscope and/or dental loupes could enhance the practitioner’s ability to locate the second mesiobuccal canal (MB2) canal of maxillary molars in an in vivo, clinical setting. The participating endodontists documented 312 cases of root canal therapy on maxillary first and second molars. Participants that used the microscope or dental loupes located the MB2 canal with a frequency of 57.4% and 55.3%, respectively. Those using no magnification located the MB2 canal with a frequency of 18.2%. When no magnification was used, significantly fewer MB2 canals were located based by Chi-square analysis at p < 0.01. There was no significant difference between the use of the microscope and dental loupes in the frequency of locating the MB2 canal. When the maxillary first molars were considered separately, the frequency of MB2 canal detection for the microscope, dental loupes, and no magnification groups was 71.1%, 62.5%, and 17.2%, respectively. The results of this study show that the use of magnification in combined groups leads to a MB2 detection rate approximately three times that of the nonmagnification group and that the use of no magnification results in the location of significantly fewer MB2 canals. Based on these results, more emphasis should be placed on the importance of using magnification for locating the MB2 canal.
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