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Bacteriology of acute periapical abscess in children

  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Brook is an associate professor, pediatrics, Uniformed Services for the Health Sciences, Bethesda.
    Itzhak Brook
    Correspondence
    Request for reprints should directed to Dr. Brook, Naval Medical Research Institute, National Naval Medical Center Bethesda, Md 20014.
    Footnotes
    1 Dr. Brook is an associate professor, pediatrics, Uniformed Services for the Health Sciences, Bethesda.
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  • Author Footnotes
    2 Md. Dr. Grimm is a fellow, department of dentistry Children's Hospital, National Medical Center.
    Stephen Grimm
    Footnotes
    2 Md. Dr. Grimm is a fellow, department of dentistry Children's Hospital, National Medical Center.
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  • Author Footnotes
    3 Dr. Kielich is an associate professor, pedodontics, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.
    Raymond B. Kielich
    Footnotes
    3 Dr. Kielich is an associate professor, pedodontics, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Brook is an associate professor, pediatrics, Uniformed Services for the Health Sciences, Bethesda.
    2 Md. Dr. Grimm is a fellow, department of dentistry Children's Hospital, National Medical Center.
    3 Dr. Kielich is an associate professor, pedodontics, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC.
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      Abstract

      Aspiration of periapical abscess was aseptically performed in 12 children. Patients' median age was nine years (range: 5 to 16 years), and eight were males. All aspirates yielded bacterial growth when cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Anaerobes were isolated in all patients; in eight patients (67%), the anaerobes were the only organism isolated, and in four (33%), they were mixed with aerobes. There were 53 anaerobic isolates (4.4 per specimen); 20 Bacteroides species (including 9 B melaninogenicus; 3 B oralis; and 3 B corrodens): 17 anaerobic grampositive cocci; five fusobacterium species; and three Actinomyces species. There were 6 aerobic isolates (.5 per specimen); 3 Stretococcus salivarius, 2 alpha hemolytic streptococci, and one gamma hemolytic streptoccus. Beta lactamase production was noticed in four isolates recovered from four patients (33%). These were three of nine B melaninogenicus, and one of three B oralis. Our findings indicate the major role of anaerobic organisms in the polymicrobial etiology of periapical abscesses in children.
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