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The Effectiveness of a Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescent Device for the Diagnosis of a Cracked Tooth: A Case Report

  • Sung-Ae Son
    Affiliations
    Department ofConservative Dentistry, Dental and Life Science Institute, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Dental Research Institute, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
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  • Jae-Hoon Kim
    Affiliations
    Department ofDental Education, Dental and Life Science Institute, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Dental Research Institute, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
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  • Jeong-Kil Park
    Correspondence
    Address requests for reprints to Prof Jeong-Kil Park, Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University Geumo-ro 20, Mulgeum-eup, Box 50612, Yangsan, Republic of Korea.
    Affiliations
    Department ofConservative Dentistry, Dental and Life Science Institute, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Dental Research Institute, Yangsan, Republic of Korea
    Search for articles by this author
Published:August 22, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2021.08.007

      Abstract

      Diagnosing a cracked tooth is a challenge for dental clinicians. This report describes the use of a quantitative light-induced fluorescent (QLF) device that detects fluorescence reactions with visible light (405 nm) to visually identify microscopic tooth cracks during the diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth that caused pulp disease. Fluorescence images of the occlusal surface, before and after removal of the restoration, and inside of the access cavity for root canal treatment were obtained using an intraoral capture-type QLF device (Q-ray penC; AIOBIO, Seoul, Korea). The device provided visual information such as enhanced magnification and fluorescent images to identify cracks on the exterior of the tooth, around restorations, and inside the cavity after removal of the restoration by a simple image capture process. The device was able to demonstrate the existence of the crack line and to predict the depth of cracks during treatment.The QLF device showed a potential benefit in the diagnosis and characterization, including the location and depth, of tooth cracks.

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